+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 63
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    2,530
    Quote Originally Posted by Plainsman View Post


    Nice, Toby! That's funny!

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    2,530
    Quote Originally Posted by Plainsman View Post
    But hey, the ratings for the Finals were the highest since Jordan ............. so maybe the sports fandom just doesn't care , anymore.
    If next season looks to play out the same as this year, I'll be very curious to see if those ratings hold. Plus, the ratings are less important to the tv networks than how many games are played.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    5,411
    Quote Originally Posted by Why Not? View Post
    If next season looks to play out the same as this year, I'll be very curious to see if those ratings hold. Plus, the ratings are less important to the tv networks than how many games are played.
    I can almost guarantee that they will decline. This year was a see how this goes approach almost history sweeping everyone. The kind of thing that gets old quick and everyone I know said this playoffs was pretty much boring

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Fayetteville, AR
    Posts
    745
    Colin Cowherd says dynasties are good for the NBA. I do agree with that and so do the ratings. However I think the dynasty needs to be beatable. Golden State is an unbeatable dynasty when healthy. That's not good long term. What the NBA doesn't want is fans and teams giving up on their franchises and to stop watching. That's going to happen if some things don't change.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    2,530
    Eh...he might be right. People loved the days when the Yankees ruled the roost in baseball. They also loved Russell's Celtics, Magic's Lakers, and Jordan's Bulls in the NBA. But, if he IS right, perhaps the smart move for OKC is not to trade Russ, but to sell the franchise and let the big cities have it.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    5,411
    Quote Originally Posted by Why Not? View Post
    Eh...he might be right. People loved the days when the Yankees ruled the roost in baseball. They also loved Russell's Celtics, Magic's Lakers, and Jordan's Bulls in the NBA. But, if he IS right, perhaps the smart move for OKC is not to trade Russ, but to sell the franchise and let the big cities have it.
    If Russ decides not to stay at OKC.. I can almost guarantee that will be the noise is how long will OKC keep the franchise? Maybe not this year but in a couple years when nobody is buying season tkt's etc..

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK
    Posts
    45,681
    Quote Originally Posted by gthunder View Post
    If Russ decides not to stay at OKC.. I can almost guarantee that will be the noise is how long will OKC keep the franchise? Maybe not this year but in a couple years when nobody is buying season tkt's etc..
    We got a crappy team to begin with and no idea how good things would turn out but we supported them big time from day 1. As long as there is hope for the future, the franchise will be fine. It will always be the case that our franchise will have ups and downs and I don't believe our fans are that fickle to stop supporting them in droves if we have to rebuild.
    Favorite quote: 'Keep it close and let SINGLER work his playmaking magic late in the game'

    Welcome to the new NBA. Four quarters of dance competition (Thunder Girls vs. the Laker Girls!) interrupted by brief displays of basketball.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK; Farm: Hannibal Harlin Estates, Jones Prairie, TX
    Posts
    2,634
    Quote Originally Posted by Knrstz View Post
    Colin Cowherd says dynasties are good for the NBA. I do agree with that and so do the ratings. However I think the dynasty needs to be beatable. Golden State is an unbeatable dynasty when healthy. That's not good long term. What the NBA doesn't want is fans and teams giving up on their franchises and to stop watching. That's going to happen if some things don't change.
    Agree 100%.

    Commissioner Adam Silver needs to step in and stop this 'Super Team' trend or it's will be detrimental to the NBA. Wonder of Stern would have allowed Durant to sign with the Warriors or could he have stopped that transaction.

    He (David Stern) blocked a trade that involved Chris Paul to the Lakers: http://lakersblog.latimes.com/lakers...vid-stern.html

    Could he have done the same with FA signings or is this a different situation?
    Last edited by Laramie; 06-20-2017 at 09:24 AM.
    "It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change." Charles Darwin

    "Oklahoma City looks oh-so pretty... ...as I get my kicks on Route 66." --Nat King Cole.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    2,571
    Quote Originally Posted by Laramie View Post
    Agree 100%.

    Commissioner Adam Silver needs to step in and stop this 'Super Team' trend or it's will be the detrimental to the NBA. Wonder of Stern would have allowed Durant to sign with the Warriors or could he have stopped that transaction.

    He (David Stern) blocked a trade that involved Chris Paul to the Lakers: http://lakersblog.latimes.com/lakers...vid-stern.html

    Could he have done the same with FA signings or is this a different situation?
    No commissioner can stop a free agent signing unless it violates the collective bargaining agreement.

    No commissioner can ever void a trade agreed upon by the teams UNLESS one of the teams involved in the trade is owned by the league itself. That has happened once and Stern was well within his rights to void that deal.

    The league no longer owns any franchises so the commissioner can't veto any trades and can only nullify an fa signing if it violates the cba.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    2,571
    Quote Originally Posted by Knrstz View Post
    Colin Cowherd says dynasties are good for the NBA. I do agree with that and so do the ratings. However I think the dynasty needs to be beatable. Golden State is an unbeatable dynasty when healthy. That's not good long term. What the NBA doesn't want is fans and teams giving up on their franchises and to stop watching. That's going to happen if some things don't change.
    This would be a good start.

    https://sports.yahoo.com/sources-and...153941238.html

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    OKC's Green Country
    Posts
    4,851
    Quote Originally Posted by Laramie View Post
    Agree 100%.

    Commissioner Adam Silver needs to step in and stop this 'Super Team' trend or it's will be the detrimental to the NBA. Wonder of Stern would have allowed Durant to sign with the Warriors or could he have stopped that transaction.

    He (David Stern) blocked a trade that involved Chris Paul to the Lakers: http://lakersblog.latimes.com/lakers...vid-stern.html

    Could he have done the same with FA signings or is this a different situation?
    Blocking the Flopper trade was a totally different circumstance. Remember that the league had actually taken over the Hornet's franchise at the time, so it was not Stern who blocked that trade, it was the owners of the team involved in the trade. Stern was just the mouthpiece announcing that the horribly one-sided trade was not happening. Personally, I thought he should said the Fakers could kiss his ass when he announced it, but that's just me.

    The circumstance of Cupcake going to Oakland was just a weird coincidence of things. First and most important, the Whore-iors had two superstar-level players (Klay Thompson and Stephen Curry) who were playing for less than market salaries. Then, the salary cap spiked up higher than anyone estimated last summer. This enabled GSW to bring in a max-salary free agent player and still keep their two superstars (and notice that I don't include ball-buster among their superstars; he is a nice complementary player, but not a star, IMO). No team would be in a position to do that now, because no team has two stars "donating" their services.

    But if stars decide to take below-market pay in order to team up with other stars, I don't think there is much the NBA can do about it. The entire salary cap/luxury tax structure is built to maintain competitive balance in the NBA (no team should be able to afford more than two stars), but it assumes that players will want to make the most money that they can. Cupcake, for example is already saying he will take $4MM less than the max on his next contract in order to keep Steph Curry with a max deal, in Oakland with him.

    The Heatles started this. I don't think the genie can be put back into the bottle.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1,084
    Been saying this for a few years now but if you want true parity then something like the Aussie NBL system should be implemented. Then players cannot take pay cuts to stay together as it eliminates that as an option due to the points system part of the cap.

    SALARY CAP AND PLAYER POINTS

    Prior to the 2003-04 season, the NBL instituted a groundbreaking new Points System aimed at providing a level playing field for all teams by ensuring a more even distribution of talent and experience around the league. Prior to the 2009/10 season, a number of reforms were made to the system to ensure that it continued to operate effectively.

    Teams must conform to both the NBL Points System and NBL Salary Cap. A basic explanation of the NBL Points System and the NBL Salary Cap for fans is detailed below, it also includes an explanation for the Marquee Player Rule which was implemented prior to the 2014/15 season.

    Player Points System

    Each NBL player will be allocated a Player Points Ranking (PPR) between 1 and 10 prior to each season based on their performance in the NBL or based on the league they have participated in for the season just concluded. This ranking will be updated each year.

    For the purposes of NBL player contracting, a player will retain his PPR as at the commencement of the contract and for the duration of that contract. Subsequent NBL playing contracts between the same player and the same club will use the allocated PPR at the commencement season of the new contract.

    All initial PPR’s will be reviewed by the Points Appeal Panel prior to the rankings being released to the players. Players who dispute the PPR assigned to them have the opportunity to have such ranking reviewed by the NBL Points Appeals Panel.

    The NBL Commission and NBLPA determined the TTP will be 70 points per club. The TTP calculation for each Club is to include all players on the club’s active roster, up to and including players 11 & 12 if contracted. Registered NBL Development players are exempt from the calculation of the TTP.

    All first year Restricted Players (imports) shall be assigned a PPR of 10 for the duration of their initial NBL Contract. For subsequent contracts these players’ PPR will be determined using the PPR principles applied to all other contracted NBL players.

    Salary Cap and Marquee Player Rule

    The NBL Salary Cap, like the NBL Points System, is a device used to ensure parity within the league while allowing teams from different sized markets to compete evenly for playing talent. The Salary Cap for the NBL is set at AUD $1,000,000

    Ahead of the 2014/15 season the NBL announced the introduction of a Marquee Player Rule which allows for a team to pay one player above the salary cap. This recruiting tool is an important move to allow greater talent in the NBL as well as to retain local players who could be tempted by lucrative opportunities in other leagues.

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    1,806
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Early View Post
    The Heatles started this. I don't think the genie can be put back into the bottle.
    Duncan, Ginobli and Parker were leaving money on the table before the Heat happened. No one wants to blame the Spurs because they are the 3rd smallest market in the NBA, but they were the first team to have multiple players leaving significant money on the table. That doesn't count the players taking less to chase rings and that goes back 15+ years.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    2,571
    Quote Originally Posted by Kizz Fastfists View Post
    Duncan, Ginobli and Parker were leaving money on the table before the Heat happened. No one wants to blame the Spurs because they are the 3rd smallest market in the NBA, but they were the first team to have multiple players leaving significant money on the table. That doesn't count the players taking less to chase rings and that goes back 15+ years.
    Ginobili was already in his 30's and coming off the bench. Unlike the Heatles, he wasn't getting better offers from other teams.

    Duncan was making over $20 million in 2009 getting bounced in the 2nd round by Dallas and then in 2010 in the first round by Phoenix. At that point, the Spurs felt he was over the hill and that their window was closed. At that point, Kawhi was drafted and their fortunes changed.

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    5,411
    Quote Originally Posted by BabyJordanSingler View Post
    We got a crappy team to begin with and no idea how good things would turn out but we supported them big time from day 1. As long as there is hope for the future, the franchise will be fine. It will always be the case that our franchise will have ups and downs and I don't believe our fans are that fickle to stop supporting them in droves if we have to rebuild.
    I didn't say it would happen but there would be noise. This would be the era after.... after we lost 3 MVP caliber players ont he same team and came up short.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts